Kara Meyer, Ph.D. - Psychology Services
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MENTAL HEALTH DAY

May 14, 2014 is Mental Health Day. Raising awareness about mental health can help reduce stigma and lead to prevention, as well as increased support to those who are affected. So, let’s take a look at some information about mental health.  

  • Approximately 1 in 4 adults in the United States experience a mental health disorder in any given year. Mental illness can affect individuals of any race, religion, gender, economic status, and cultural background.  
  • According the World Health Organization, approximately 20% of the world’s children and adolescents experience mental health concerns.
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 38,000 people dying by suicide each year. This is more than those who die by homicide.
  • Despite advances in knowledge about mental health and efforts to raise awareness, a lot of stigma remains. Many misconceptions exist regarding the nature of mental illness and those affected. Probably the most damaging is the misconception that mental illness is the result of personality flaws, weakness or laziness. Stigma can lead to abuse, rejection, isolation, and hopelessness. Stigma can also prevent individuals from seeking help.
  • There are a number of effective treatments for mental illness, including cognitive behavioral therapy. According to NAMI, between 70 and 90% of individuals with mental illness experience symptom reduction and improved quality of life with effective treatment, particularly a combination of pharmacological treatment and psychosocial treatment and supports.
  • Friends and family members can help. Acknowledging a loved one’s concerns and respecting them as individuals is important. Reach out and provide the support you can. Educate yourself about mental health, and do what you can to correct misconceptions.

- Kara Meyer, Ph.D.

**The content of this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be and should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other medical professional. This blog does not provide clinical advice, nor should its contents be considered clinical advice. Should you have any healthcare-related questions, please call or see your physician or other healthcare provider promptly.