Kara Meyer, Ph.D. - Psychology Services
RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

MENTAL HEALTH DAY
LETTING GO OF GOALS
FAMILY RITUALS
RESILIENCE
FEELING HAPPY

Most Popular Posts

OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
ASSERTIVENESS
WORLD SUICIDE PREVENTION DAY
MANAGING STRESS
STRESS

Categories

ADHD
Anger
Anxiety
Behavior
Child Psychology
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Communication
Depression
Exposure and Response Prevention
Family
Family Rituals
Goal Setting
Happiness
Homework
Mental Ilness
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Psychology in the News
Resilience
Routines
School Issues
Seasonal Affective Disorder
Stress
Suicide
Teens
Therapy
powered by

My Blog

DAILY ROUTINES

Daily routines are those things that we tend to do in the same order, around the same time each day. They can include discipline, mealtime, bedtime, and homework routines. Parents are encouraged to implement daily routines in their child’s life, and with good reason. Routines add structure to a family’s daily life, and as a result, foster a sense of predictability, stability, and control.  

Research shows that families who implement daily routines experience a number of benefits. Routines can lead to increased cooperation and positive parent-child interactions, as well as aid in the development of self-control in young children. Routines are also linked to decreased disruptive behavior and conflict overall. Additionally, use of mealtime routines is linked to an increase in consumption of healthy foods and decreases in unhealthy eating behavior (binging and purging), while bedtime routines are linked to better quality sleep. In the same way, homework routines are known to improve homework completion and cooperation regarding school. Finally, parents who implement daily routines tend to be less stressed and feel more effective as parents.  

To implement routines in your household, try the following:       
  • Begin by developing a daily schedule for your household.      
  • Pick an activity from that schedule, such as bedtime. 
  • Consider the steps necessary to complete that task and organize them into a sequence that makes sense for you and your child. For example, a bedtime routine may include taking a bath, putting on pajamas, brushing teeth, saying goodnight, reading a bedtime story, and turning out the lights.
  • Establish rules and expectations for each task, including a consequence. For example, praise for effort.  

Remember do not be too rigid. Unexpected events happen often. Be willing to be flexible and make changes when things come up to foster adaptability.  

- Kara Meyer, Ph.D.

**The content of this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be and should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other medical professional. This blog does not provide clinical advice, nor should its contents be considered clinical advice. Should you have any healthcare-related questions, please call or see your physician or other healthcare provider promptly.