Kara Meyer, Ph.D. - Psychology Services
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SUMMER WORK FOR TEENS

With summer break right around the corner many teenagers are thinking about getting a summer job. There are a number of benefits to having a summer job, as well as a number of things to keep in mind when your teen is searching for work.  

Encourage your teen to search for a job in an area that interests them. Yet, help them keep in mind that they may not always get the job their heart desires. This, in and of itself, is a learning experience. Not getting a job one had hoped for helps teens learn to deal with the feelings of rejection. This can help them develop important problem solving skills and how to readjust their goals.  

Applying for a job and gaining employment help teach important life skills as well. For example, your teen will learn how to complete an application and develop a resume. Likewise, they’ll also learn about how to present themselves and how the interview process works. Working also helps develop a sense of responsibility by having to manage a schedule, show up on time, dress appropriately, and fulfill the job description. Furthermore, earning a paycheck also teaches teens how to save and manage money.  

Working can also help teens become more independent. They will learn new skills, while gaining confidence in their abilities. They will also learn how deal with challenging situations and difficult people. In addition, having a summer job will provide your teen with many new experiences and the opportunity to build new social relationships.  

Again, when searching for a job, encourage your teen to look into jobs that match their interests. Be sure to encourage them to search broadly by looking online, checking out the local newspaper, as well as asking their school counselor or friends and family about possible opportunities. If they are unable to find a job, encourage them to think outside the box and look into babysitting, pet sitting, tutoring, etc. They can also look into volunteer opportunities. 

Keep these things in mind when considering your teen’s safety when working: Teens should not have jobs that require them to work alone at night or at odd hours. Similarly, they should not be working too many hours. Furthermore, they should avoid work that involves operating complicated equipment or heavy machinery. Check out the Youth Rules website for more information on youth employment regulations. 

Good luck and happy hunting!  

- Kara Meyer, Ph.D.


**The content of this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be and should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other medical professional. This blog does not provide clinical advice, nor should its contents be considered clinical advice. Should you have any healthcare-related questions, please call or see your physician or other healthcare provider promptly.